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Camborne

Camborne is an important market and industrial town in west Cornwall. Together with the neighbouring settlements of Redruth and Pool it forms the largest urban conurbation in Cornwall. Mining history dominates both the fabric of the place and the culture of the people.

Camborne functioned through most of its history as a local church town, a hamlet sized settlement serving farming settlements scattered through the parish. By the seventeenth century the town had become a service and market town, acquiring formal market and fair rights as late as 1708. This increase in commercial activity was connected with local tin streaming and shallow tin mining, first recorded here from the 1400s, and adit mining first recorded by the sixteenth century. It was the early eighteenth century development of the local copper mines and the subsequent eighteenth and nineteenth-century industrialisation of tin and copper mining that transformed the surrounding area into Cornwall’s principal industrial centre and set the town on a new development trajectory. During the nineteenth century Camborne became Cornwall’s most industrialised town, expanding rapidly to house both the ever expanding workforce and the associated industrial processes, such as the internationally important Holman drill works. With this expansion the town was quickly urbanised, becoming a rival to the earlier established town of Redruth. The numerous impressive late nineteenth century civic, religious and commercial buildings are testimony to the success of this period. However, with the decline in Cornish mining the economic success of the town weakened. The CompAir Holman works has recently closed, although another engineering firm is reusing part of the site.

Downloads:
The downloads offered below represent the different elements of the CSUS Camborne Report including the core text, seven illustrative figures and five character area summaries. The majority of the downloads are large files (to maintain some quality of image resolution) and therefore may take time to download.

  Title Description

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CSUS Camborne Report REPORT text detailing the results of the historic character study for the town of Camborne. Kate Newell, Historic Environment Service..

Format type: PDF

2035kb

Figure 1 - Location & Topography Map Map showing the location of Camborne and its immediate topography.

Format type: PDF

3721kb
Figure 2 - Ordnance Survey 2nd Edition 1:2500 Map (c.1907) Map showing the town of Camborne in c.1907.

Format type: PDF

2556kb
Figure 3 - Historic Development Map Map showing the historic development and expansion of Camborne.

Format type: PDF

2054kb
Figure 4 - Historic Settlement Topography Map Map showing the historic topography of Camborne with key areas of historic activity.

Format type: PDF

2059kb
Figures 5 - Surviving Historic Components Maps Maps showing the surviving historic buildings of Camborne Format type: PDF 2830kb
Figure 6 - Urban Archaeological Potential Map Map showing the areas and sites of archaeological potential in Camborne.

Format type: PDF

1843kb

Figure 7 - Character Areas Map Map showing the seven character areas identified by the survey of Camborne.

Format type: PDF

1871kb

Character Area 1- Church town and commercial core Summarises the comprehensive assessments of character and regeneration opportunities of the Church town and commercial core This is the historic heart of the town and its nineteenth-century commercial and civic core. The church complex, with its early stone crosses and the radiating road pattern meeting in front of the former market house, is a reminder of the pre-industrial church town. This area is the most urban part of the town with an impressive collection of eighteenth-century inns and three storey townhouses. The exuberant nineteenth-century commercial premises (some with surviving shop fronts), civic and religious buildings are a major asset for the town.

Format type: PDF

1112 kb
Character Area 2  - Industrial workers’ housing Summarises the comprehensive assessments of character and regeneration opportunities of the  gridded rows and terraces of industrial workers housing that are a dominant feature of the town. Set along wide, straight and level roads the low rising two storey cottages provide low enclosure levels compared to other Cornish townscapes. The granite robustness of the buildings is lightened by the restrained use of ornamentation and bright colour to door and window finishes. Long, thin rear gardens are an integral part of this Character Area and an important factor in the nineteenth-century industrialisation and move from country to town, which they document.

Format type: PDF

1487kb

Character Area 3 - The industrial legacy Summarises the comprehensive assessments of character and regeneration opportunities of the vidence of Camborne’s past industrial significance is retained in its townscape. Sites such as Wheal Harriet with its standing engine house and surrounding former mining land, the Holman No 3 complex and nearby forge and workshop by the railway station, Stray Park engine house and the former CompAir Holman works tell of this important and successful past that shaped the town we see today.

Format type: PDF

1272kb
Character Area 4 - South west villa suburbs Summarises the comprehensive assessments of character and regeneration opportunities of the South west villa suburbs To the south west of the urban core there is a suburban area of middle-class residences. Large villas and genteel residences, set within bounded grounds but highly visible from the road, give the area a salubrious character. Painted render and classical architectural references are common features of the area. Many buildings are architect designed. Planting softens the built environment and the sloping topography of Trevu Road provides interesting views to the town below.

Format type: PDF

1272kb

Character Area 5 - Rosewarne Summarises the comprehensive assessments of character and regeneration opportunities of Rosewarne, a secluded and private, inward-looking area, formerly the house and grounds of Rosewarne and Parc-Bracket houses. Although redeveloped in the late twentieth century as housing estates, the character of the grand house complex is retained due to the survival of key buildings and landscape planting. The mature trees surviving from the former parkland have town-wide impact and importance. The town’s car parks are on land taken from the gardens, including Rosewarne’s walled kitchen garden.

Format type: PDF

1254 kb

   

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